Hosanna! Blessed is the King Who Comes in the Name of the Lord!

A Homily for Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

Text: St. Luke 19:28-40


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Grace to you and peace from God our Heavenly Father and Christ Jesus our Lord, the triumphant king. Amen.

A city on the brink.

Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims flood the streets.

Riots are an ever-present danger.

Roman soldiers are on edge, afraid that radicalized zealot might attack at any point.

You can cut the tension Continue reading “Hosanna! Blessed is the King Who Comes in the Name of the Lord!”

Pope Francis: The Stones Cry Out!

From Pope Francis’ homily on Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion:

Dear young people, you have it in you to shout. It is up to you to opt for Sunday’s “Hosanna!”, so as not to fall into Friday’s “Crucify him!”… It is up to you not to keep quiet. Even if others keep quiet, if we older people and leaders – so often corrupt – keep quiet, if the whole world keeps quiet and loses its joy, I ask you: Will you cry out?

Please, make that choice, before the stones themselves cry out.

And from his homily preached at the Great Vigil of Easter:

It is the silent night of those disciples who are disoriented because they are plunged in a crushing routine that robs memory, silences hope and leads to thinking that “this is the way things have always been done”. Those disciples who, overwhelmed, have nothing to say and end up considering “normal” and unexceptional the words of Caiaphas: “Can you not see that it is better for you to have one man die for the people than to have the whole nation destroyed?” (Jn 11:50).

Amid our silence, our overpowering silence, the stones begin to cry out (cf. Lk 19:40) and to clear the way for the greatest message that history has ever heard: “He is not here, for he has been raised” (Mt 28:6). The stone before the tomb cried out and proclaimed the opening of a new way for all. Creation itself was the first to echo the triumph of life over all that had attempted to silence and stifle the joy of the Gospel. The stone before the tomb was the first to leap up and in its own way intone a song of praise and wonder, of joy and hope, in which all of us are invited to join.

Read the entire text for both sermons at Whispers in the Loggia.

A Divine Protest

A Homily for Palm Sunday

Text: St. Mark 11:1-11


Grace to you and peace from God our Heavenly Father and Christ Jesus our Lord, the triumphant king. Amen.

Can you feel the tension in the air?

You can cut it with the knife.

The world feels like it’s on the very verge of coming undone.

In the shadow of Rome, a divisive preacher arrives riding on the foal of a donkey, echoing the ascension of King Solomon, the Son of David. It was Passover, the city had swollen to many times its usual population, and was full of pilgrims eager for the liberation foreshadowed in the exodus.

For the disciples, this was it. Isaiah had said that the Messiah would free the oppressed, right? And how much more oppressed could you possibly get than Judea under the Roman Empire? The confrontation between the world and God must be at hand. Finally, the Roman oppressors would be overthrown. This was what all of history had been building towards. Continue reading “A Divine Protest”

From the Mount of Olives to Golgotha:The Palm/Passion Sunday Paradox

palmsundayHoly Week takes us through a liturgical and emotional swing, from cries of “Hosanna!” to “Crucify him!” to “Alleluia!” But that swing is sudden, making that first move over the course of the Liturgy of the Word on Sunday morning. We gather with palms, kids joining in excited because things are so very different this day. And then by the sermon, a pall has fallen over the assembly. Somehow, Christ has been crucified — and we haven’t even gotten to Maundy Thursday yet.

Palm Sunday presents a particularly vexing issue for those involved in planning Christian worship. We begin outside with a collect and Gospel reading, process inside and…have another collect and another Gospel reading. We somehow jump the gun straight from the palms to the Cross. Why? And which text should a preacher take into the pulpit? And what songs should we sing? Continue reading “From the Mount of Olives to Golgotha:The Palm/Passion Sunday Paradox”